Category Archives: Government reforms

Government reforms (3): Tribunal claims

What do we already know? We updated you in our July 2017 Newsflash Tribunal fees unlawful – enormous impact that the Supreme Court ruled that Tribunal fees are unlawful and abolished them, back-dated to their inception in July 2013. We also warned that Tribunals could be about to be deluged by new and backdated claims, which would…
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Government reforms (2): Data protection – GDPR guidance

data protection
What do we already know? We have been regularly updating you about the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which on 25 May 2018 will replace the current EU Data Protection Directive and the Data Protection Act 1998. For further detail see our updates here. What’s new? 1. Data Protection Bill The Information Commissioner’s Office…
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Government reforms (1): Taxation of termination payments

What do we already know? Currently, payments on termination that are made under a contractual PILON (pay in lieu of notice) clause in an employee’s contract are taxed as earnings, but if there is no PILON an equivalent payment can often be made tax free (up to £30,000) as it is characterised as “damages for breach of contract.” However,…
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Government reforms (1): New Year, New Law

In order to welcome in 2018, below is a round-up of the most important employment law changes this year.   We’re sure to be covering many of these events in more detail in our Newsflashes and Newsletters so watch this space… EXPECTED EARLY 2018 The Gig Economy and Ongoing Employment Status Cases We will likely continue…
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Government reforms (3): Data protection – GDPR guidance

data protection
What do we already know? We have been regularly updating you about the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which on 25 May 2018 will replace the current EU Data Protection Directive and the Data Protection Act 1998. For further detail see our updates here and summary of the new law above at New Year,…
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Government reforms (2): Employment status – Government response to the Taylor review

employment status
What do we already know? We updated you in our July 2017 Newsletter Government reforms (1): Employment status – Taylor Review that the Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices had been published.  The Taylor Review made detailed recommendations for reform of UK employment law in respect of those who are not engaged as traditional employees, both in…
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Government reforms (1): Data protection – GDPR guidance

data protection
What do we already know? We have been regularly updating you about the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which on 25 May 2018 will replace the current EU Data Protection Directive and the Data Protection Act 1998. For further detail see our updates here. What’s new? 1. The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has published…
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Government reforms (2): Time to close the gap – Gender pay gap enforcement

What do we already know? We have been keeping you up to date on the Government’s proposals to introduce new gender pay reporting requirements and how our Gender Pay Gap Audit service can help you with this. For an overview of the reporting requirements see our February 2016 Newsletter Government reforms (2): Gender pay – mend the gap!…
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Government reforms: Employment status – framework for modern employment

employed stamp
What do we already know? We updated you in our July 2017 Newsletter Government reforms (1): Employment status – Taylor Review that the Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices had been published which focused on the importance of quality work: “fair and decent work with realistic scope for development and fulfilment” for all.  The Review…
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Government reforms (2): Tribunal fees – refunds available (finally!)

tribunal fees - stack of pound coins
What do we already know? We updated you in our July 2017 Newsflash Tribunal fees unlawful – enormous impact that the Supreme Court ruled Tribunal fees unlawful and removed them with immediate effect, including retrospectively all the way back to their start in July 2013. The Supreme Court’s decision also meant the refunding of all…
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