Category Archives: Government reforms

Government Reforms (3):  Guidance on Pregnancy, Breastfeeding and Health & Safety

The TUC and Maternity Action have warned that employers are not doing enough to protect pregnant women at work and have published new guidance for health and safety representatives on “Pregnancy, breastfeeding and health and safety”, available here. In the new guidance, the TUC and Maternity Action explain that there are clear laws in place…
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Government Reforms (2):  Gender Pay Gap & Promoting Female Talent

mind-the-gap
The Government Equalities Office has published guidance (available here) for employers on actions they can take to promote women’s progression in the workplace and close the gender pay gap. The guidance focuses on: creating an inclusive culture; supporting women’s career development; progression for part-time workers; improving recruitment and promotion processes; and measuring and evaluating policies…
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Government Reforms (1):  BREXIT – EU Settlement Scheme

brexit
What do we already know? When the UK leaves the EU, with or without a deal, free movement of people will be allowed to continue for a transitional period from the exit date for approximately two years. EU citizens and family members who want to continue to live and work in the UK beyond 30…
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Government Reforms (1): Public Sector Exit Payments – CAPS LOCK ON…

What do we already know? We updated you in our October 2015 Newsletter Government reforms (1): Cap on exit payments that the Government proposed that exit payments to public sector workers should be capped at £95,000 (which include pay in lieu or notice, redundancy and ex gratia payments). There was also a consultation at this time and…
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Government Reforms (3): Family Friendly – Protection Against Redundancy

What do we already know? In our February 2019 Newsletter Government reforms (1): Family friendly – protection against redundancy we updated you that the Government had published a consultation, Pregnancy and Maternity Discrimination: Consultation on extending redundancy protection for women and new parents (available here).  The consultation asked for views on what changes could be…
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Government Reforms (2): Modern slavery

What do we already know? We updated you in our February 2016 Newsletter Government reforms (1): Modern slavery disclosure obligations that organisations which: have a worldwide turnover in excess of £36 million per year; supply goods or services; and carry on business, in whole or in part, in the United Kingdom; need to comply with the UK’s…
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Government Reforms (3): BREXIT – Government Guidance

Brexit
The Home Office has published guidance on: 1. EU Settlement Scheme The guidance (available here), provides information on the documents necessary to prove a person’s relationship to an EU citizen, submitting evidence of the EU citizen’s identity and nationality, as well as evidence of the EU citizen’s continuous residence in the UK. The guidance explains…
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Government Reforms (1): Gender Pay Gap returns

What do we already know? Gender pay gap reporting was introduced in 2017. The gender pay gap is the difference between the average earnings of men and women, expressed as a percentage of men’s earnings. The Government’s intention is to encourage employers to consider and, if required, take appropriate actions to reduce or eliminate their…
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Government Reforms (1): April changes – Are you ready?

spring cleaning
It’s nearly April and, as usual, this month sees a spring clean for employment law.  Although we’ve covered the majority of these changes in previous newsletters and alerts, we thought it was worth a quick reminder: 1 April 2019 Increase in National Living and Minimum Wage The new rates are as follows: Age 25 and…
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Government Reforms (2): Consultation on confidentiality clauses

What do we already know? Confidentiality clauses or non-disclosure agreements (‘NDA’s) serve a useful purpose in the workplace. They can be used primarily in two ways: as part of employment contracts, to protect trade secrets for example, and as part of settlement agreements, for example to allow both sides of an employment dispute to move…
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