Category Archives: Government reforms

Government Reforms (4): BREXIT – the final chapter?

Brexit
1. Home office employers toolkit The Home Office has published an employer toolkit (available here) which provides information for employers to be able to support EU citizens and their families when applying to the EU settlement scheme during the public test phase. The toolkit includes a leaflet, poster and briefing pack in order to ensure…
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Government Reforms (3): GEO – Gender Pay Gap guidance

mind-the-gap
The Government Equalities Office (GEO) has published two new pieces of guidance (available here) for employers to help them identify the potential causes of any gender pay gap (GPG) within their organisation and develop an effective approach to tackle it: Eight ways to understand your organisation’s gender pay gap (available here); and Four steps to…
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Government reforms (1): Family friendly – Protection against redundancy

In 2016 the Women and Equalities Select Committee held an inquiry into pregnancy and maternity discrimination (see our Blog Is employment law currently failing pregnant women?). The Committee found that discrimination against pregnant women and new mothers had become more common over the previous ten years and recommended steps that the Government should take to…
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Government reforms (2): Good work plan (response to Taylor Review) updated

employment status
What do we already know? The Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices (‘the Taylor Review’), made detailed recommendations for reform of UK employment law in respect of those who are not engaged as traditional employees, both in the “gig economy” and elsewhere.  For further detail on the background of this Review please see our updates…
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Government reforms (3): BREXIT – The final chapter?

Brexit
1. POST-BREXIT IMMIGRATION POLICY The Home Office has published the White Paper on its post-Brexit immigration policy, available here.  The White Paper sets out the proposed immigration regime that would apply from 1 January 2021, whether the UK leaves the EU with a deal or no deal. The starting point is that EU free movement…
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Government reforms (1): New Year, New Law!

Building on our new year Blog on 2019 Hot 10 Topics, we give you the dates of the most important employment law changes this year that we know of so far.   We’re sure to be covering many of these events in more detail in our Newsflashes and Newsletters so watch this space…   21 January…
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Government reforms (2): Tribunal fees to be reintroduced?

tribunal fees
The Ministry of Justice’s representative (when answering questions in the House of Commons), has confirmed that the Government is working on reintroducing fees for individuals seeking to pursue claims in the Tribunal. The Supreme Court decision in the UNISON case last year (see our update here) found the previous fee system to be unlawful. However,…
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Government reforms (2): Parental bereavement leave

picture of a sad teddy bear
What do we already know? We updated you in our September 2018 Newsletter Government reforms (2): Parental Bereavement Leave that the Parental Bereavement (Leave and Pay) Act 2018 is likely to come into force in 2020. The Act gives bereaved employees who have suffered a loss of a child under 18 years or a still…
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Government reforms (1): Budget 2018

budget breakdown
The Chancellor presented this year’s budget at the end of October 2018. Key announcements for HR/employment law are: 1. National living wage and minimum wage increases: The following National Minimum Wage (NMW) rates come into effect in April 2019: 25 years and above (the National Living Wage):  from £7.83 to £8.21 per hour; 21-24 year…
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Government Reforms (3): Top tips for staff

stack of pound coins
The Government has announced plans (available here) to ensure that tips left for workers will go to them in full.  This forms part of its modern ‘Industrial Strategy’ to end exploitative employment practices. While the Government acknowledges that most employers act in good faith, in some sectors evidence points towards poor tipping practices, including excessive…
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