Category Archives: Government reforms

Government Reforms (2): Modern slavery

What do we already know? We updated you in our February 2016 Newsletter Government reforms (1): Modern slavery disclosure obligations that organisations which: have a worldwide turnover in excess of £36 million per year; supply goods or services; and carry on business, in whole or in part, in the United Kingdom; need to comply with the UK’s…
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Government Reforms (3): BREXIT – Government Guidance

Brexit
The Home Office has published guidance on: 1. EU Settlement Scheme The guidance (available here), provides information on the documents necessary to prove a person’s relationship to an EU citizen, submitting evidence of the EU citizen’s identity and nationality, as well as evidence of the EU citizen’s continuous residence in the UK. The guidance explains…
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Government Reforms (1): Gender Pay Gap returns

What do we already know? Gender pay gap reporting was introduced in 2017. The gender pay gap is the difference between the average earnings of men and women, expressed as a percentage of men’s earnings. The Government’s intention is to encourage employers to consider and, if required, take appropriate actions to reduce or eliminate their…
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Government Reforms (1): April changes – Are you ready?

spring cleaning
It’s nearly April and, as usual, this month sees a spring clean for employment law.  Although we’ve covered the majority of these changes in previous newsletters and alerts, we thought it was worth a quick reminder: 1 April 2019 Increase in National Living and Minimum Wage The new rates are as follows: Age 25 and…
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Government Reforms (2): Consultation on confidentiality clauses

What do we already know? Confidentiality clauses or non-disclosure agreements (‘NDA’s) serve a useful purpose in the workplace. They can be used primarily in two ways: as part of employment contracts, to protect trade secrets for example, and as part of settlement agreements, for example to allow both sides of an employment dispute to move…
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Government Reforms (4): BREXIT – the final chapter?

Brexit
1. Home office employers toolkit The Home Office has published an employer toolkit (available here) which provides information for employers to be able to support EU citizens and their families when applying to the EU settlement scheme during the public test phase. The toolkit includes a leaflet, poster and briefing pack in order to ensure…
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Government Reforms (3): GEO – Gender Pay Gap guidance

mind-the-gap
The Government Equalities Office (GEO) has published two new pieces of guidance (available here) for employers to help them identify the potential causes of any gender pay gap (GPG) within their organisation and develop an effective approach to tackle it: Eight ways to understand your organisation’s gender pay gap (available here); and Four steps to…
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Government reforms (1): Family friendly – Protection against redundancy

In 2016 the Women and Equalities Select Committee held an inquiry into pregnancy and maternity discrimination (see our Blog Is employment law currently failing pregnant women?). The Committee found that discrimination against pregnant women and new mothers had become more common over the previous ten years and recommended steps that the Government should take to…
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Government reforms (2): Good work plan (response to Taylor Review) updated

employment status
What do we already know? The Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices (‘the Taylor Review’), made detailed recommendations for reform of UK employment law in respect of those who are not engaged as traditional employees, both in the “gig economy” and elsewhere.  For further detail on the background of this Review please see our updates…
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Government reforms (3): BREXIT – The final chapter?

Brexit
1. POST-BREXIT IMMIGRATION POLICY The Home Office has published the White Paper on its post-Brexit immigration policy, available here.  The White Paper sets out the proposed immigration regime that would apply from 1 January 2021, whether the UK leaves the EU with a deal or no deal. The starting point is that EU free movement…
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